Great Depression: Historical & Primary Resources: Archival and Primary Source Collections

Select resources on the Great Depression of the 1930s available at Western Libraries Heritage Resources and beyond.

Introduction

See links below for archival resources housed at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies and other repositories. 

Researchers seeking information relating to Western Washington University campus history are advised to contact staff at Western Libraries' Heritage Resources programs (the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Western Libraries Special Collections and the WWU Archives and Records Center). Useful resources may include periodicals and other Campus School Collection holdings (Western Libraries Special Collections) as well as administrative records of the university (contact WWU Archives and Records Center).

Heritage Resources Collections

Other Repositories and Online Resources

Heritage Resources

OUR MISSION

Western Libraries Heritage Resources provides for responsible stewardship of and access to unique and archival resources in support of teaching, learning and resarch at Western Washington University and beyond. The Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Special Collections, and University Archives and Records Management work together to document the culture and history of Western, the local community and Pacific Northwest region, and to promote public and scholarly access to holdings.

       

          Images from WWU Collections

          Bacon Creek, 1933 (Vic and Mae Olsen CCC collection, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Heritage Resources, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9123)

          Front row left to right: Betty (Johnson), Grace (Connelly), Billy, David; Back row: Hazel (Brown), Mollie Satko, Joe, Paul, George (Galen Biery papers and photographs #2035.3, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Heritage Resources, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9123). According to http://satkosark.org/, the "Ark of Juneau" was built in the 1930s by Paul Satko, an unemployed machinist from Richmond, VA, who, during the Great Depression, determined to take his wife and children to Alaska. After crossing the country with boat in tow, the Satkos launched the Ark of Juneau in Tacoma in May 1940, only to run aground in Seattle. Mr. and Mrs. Satko were arrested and their children taken away on the premise that the vessel was unsafe for travel to Alaska.
          After a court hearing the family did manage to embark and, under cover of darkness, eventually made it to Canadian waters where the US authorities had no jurisdiction. The Satkos arrived in Juneau on July 27, 1940, and eventually built a homestead 26 miles up the Eagle River.

          See vertical file in the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies Reference Library for more information.