SOC 302 Classical Sociological Theory: Rhetorical Moves

Rhetorical Moves

Rhetorical "Moves"

 

Here are several "moves" that you can make, along with example phrases that tell your reader which move you’re using.     

 

Grounding: Situating a claim within a particular context

·         Defining: Scholars A, B, and C define Concept X as [paraphrase of concept].

·         Framing: Historically, scholars have examined [concept] through [identify a lens or theoretical framework].

·         Illustrating: We can look to Scholar D, who illustrates many of the complexities embedded in Concept X.

·         Authorizing: Scholar C echoes what I’ve argued for, saying that [quote or paraphrase of claim].

 

Forwarding: Extending or re-purposing the ideas or expertise of others between contexts

·         Borrowing: Although Scholar C exclusively focused on [original context], the same idea can be applied to [context of subquestion].

·         Extending: While I agree with Scholar A’s main premise, I would argue that A does not go far enough and that [new idea].

·         Synthesizing: Scholars A, B, and C offer similar insights, Scholars D and E go against the grain, and Scholar F offers an entirely new explanation. Taking these valuable perspectives collectively, I conclude that [new perspective].

 

Countering: Presenting alternative perspectives or uncovering gaps in others' views

·         Arguing another side: However, Scholar A seems to have overlooked [present alternative perspective].

·         Uncovering values: If Scholars A and B had also taken [gap in thinking] into consideration, they may have reached a different conclusion.

Rhetorical "Moves"

 

Here are several "moves" that you can make, along with example phrases that tell your reader which move you’re using.     

 

Grounding: Situating a claim within a particular context

·         Defining: Scholars A, B, and C define Concept X as [paraphrase of concept].

·         Framing: Historically, scholars have examined [concept] through [identify a lens or theoretical framework].

·         Illustrating: We can look to Scholar D, who illustrates many of the complexities embedded in Concept X.

·         Authorizing: Scholar C echoes what I’ve argued for, saying that [quote or paraphrase of claim].

 

Forwarding: Extending or re-purposing the ideas or expertise of others between contexts

·         Borrowing: Although Scholar C exclusively focused on [original context], the same idea can be applied to [context of subquestion].

·         Extending: While I agree with Scholar A’s main premise, I would argue that A does not go far enough and that [new idea].

·         Synthesizing: Scholars A, B, and C offer similar insights, Scholars D and E go against the grain, and Scholar F offers an entirely new explanation. Taking these valuable perspectives collectively, I conclude that [new perspective].

 

Countering: Presenting alternative perspectives or uncovering gaps in others' views

·         Arguing another side: However, Scholar A seems to have overlooked [present alternative perspective].

·         Uncovering values: If Scholars A and B had also taken [gap in thinking] into consideration, they may have reached a different conclusion.